Energy-Efficient HOME + 10 ACRES for Sale

Our home for sale is not only beautiful, but highly energy-efficient -- SAVE MONEY EVERY MONTH!

Very low energy costs, with energy efficient geo-thermal heat pump for heating and cooling, and the house built and insulated with energy efficiency in mind. Scroll down for more information:

  • Ground Water Source Open Loop Heat Pump System
  • Utility Record (shows a total energy cost that averages $140/month).
  • Premium Insulation Systems

 

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Ground Water Source Open Loop Heat Pump System -- 2100 Five Lakes Road

This geothermal heat pump is a central heating and cooling system that transfers heat from and to the ground. It uses the earth as a heat source in the winter and a heat sink in the summer. It takes advantage of the ground's moderate and relatively constant temperatures to boost efficiency and reduce the operational costs of heating and cooling systems.

As a ground water source open loop heat pump system, it uses water from our well. The well pump was sized to more than adequately supply the water needs of the house and the heat pump. An open loop ground water source system avoids the expense and maintenance problems of closed loop systems, which are very expensive to repair if they develop leaks. The water that runs through the heat pump is returned to the ground through a very simple dry well system. This means there is no water running over the ground, or running into the lake, and does not affect the ground water level. It simply adds heat to or removes heat from the water, and returns it to groundwater -- undiminished in quality and quantity.

Besides avoiding all of the complications and expense of closed loop systems, this system also avoids the late-season temperature saturation of the ground that can occur around the closed loop, reducing the efficiency of the closed loop system.

This geothermal heat pump system has a "super heater" water heating system, which consists of two very well insulated electric element water heaters. The first water heater's electric elements are not hooked up because it is a reservoir for water that is preheated with leftover heat from the heat pump. This preheated reservoir reduces the work load of the second water heater, whose elements don't have to heat the water as much because the water is already preheated -- making it more efficient. Unrelated to water heating, there is also an 80 gal. pressure tank to serve as a water reservoir. (When the electricity has been off, this provides water needs for a significant period of time, and we can heat the house with our 2 wood stoves.)

The total-electric house is designed to be heated and cooled by a geothermal heat pump. This means that the well size and the pump capacity, as well as the design and layout of the forced air ducting was done to function efficiently with the heat pump. The house was built and insulated with energy efficiency in mind -- see the separate page with a detailed description of the house's insulation. The heat pump has backup electric resistance heat elements, as a fail-safe backup.

Together, the excellent insulation and geothermal heat pump system are so energy-efficient that our total electric energy costs over the last year (total electricity includes heat/air conditioning/water heating/cooking/lights) are shown below -- averaging $140 per month.

 


UTILITY RECORD: This screen shot from gtlakes.com shows our actual bills for the last year, demonstrating that the total energy costs for our total-electric home average $140/month.

 

2100 Five Lakes Road -- Insulation

Basic structure of the house is 2x6 studwall construction, with full log (one side flattened) siding. R-27.8+ insulation is listed from interior to exterior:

  1. 3/4-inch tongue-and-groove Western red cedar
  2. clear plastic vapor barrier
  3. 1/2-inch foil-faced high performance foamboard
  4. 2x6 studwall spaces filled with 6 inches of fiberglas insulation
  5. 1/2-inch foil-faced high performance foamboard
  6. Tyvek
  7. Logs

R-59+ roof insulation, listed from interior outward:

  1. 3/4-inch tongue-and-groove Western red cedar
  2. clear plastic vapor barrier
  3. 1/2-inch foil-faced high performance foamboard
  4. 12 inches of fiberglas insulation
  5. 3.5 inches of fiberglas insulation placed at 90 degrees to the 12-inch fiberglas, to cover the joist spaces

Lower level 2x6 studwall construction, with cedar board exterior (the portion that faces the lake) -- R-35 insulation, listed from interior to exterior:

  1. 3/4-inch tongue-and-groove Western red cedar
  2. clear plastic vapor barrier
  3. 1/2-inch foil-faced high performance foamboard
  4. 2x6 studwall spaces filled with 6 inches of fiberglas insulation
  5. 2-inch blueboard, foam-sealed at every junction and seam
  6. Tongue-and-groove cedar siding

Lower level cement block walls, from interior to exterior:

  1. Tongue-and-groove Western red cedar in lower level bedrooms and family room (the two home business rooms have 4x8 standard paneling, and the unfinished storage rooms interior walls are cement block)
  2. wood furring strips on cement block, with 1/2-inch foil-faced high performance foamboard (all lower level rooms except unfinished storage rooms)
  3. cement blocks
  4. 2-inch blueboard -- All blueboard seams are filled with spray foam. Spray-foaming the seams eliminates any break in the insulation, but also protects the entire wall system from moisture, keeping the lower level completely dry.

The blueboard covers the outside of the cement block walls and foundation down to the slab, and covers the sill-plate. 2-inch thick by 2 feet wide blueboard that is attached to the house blueboard is buried approx. 1 foot underground, angling downward and away from the house at approx. 30-degree angle. This not only keeps water away from the lower level, it also moves the frostline away from the house. Again, all these blueboard seams are filled with spray foam.

Also note: Windows are thermopane, with low-E glass.

 

 

Click here for more information about the house, including map.

Click here for more photos of the house and property.

Click here for more photos of the property and wildlife photographed here.

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